BBC tells stars not to promote clothing brands on social media after racing presenter broke rules

BBC tells stars not to promote clothing brands on social media after horse racing presenter broke society rules by tagging two fashion brands in Twitter post on Radio 5’s Grand National cover Live

  • Gina Bryce broke company rules by tagging brands in work tweets
  • She did it during the BBC’s coverage of the Grand National on Radio 5 Live
  • Dan Walker also promoted clothing brands before moving to Channel 5

The BBC has warned stars not to promote brands – after a radio presenter broke the rules while covering the Grand National last month.

Radio 5 Live horse racing presenter Gina Bryce promoted Bee Smith Millinery and Jane Lewis Atelier in a tweet about the company’s coverage of the famous race, The temperature reports.

The star wrote: ‘Big national holiday. Join me and the amazing team @bbc5live from 12pm today for all the buildup’ on Twitter and tagged both brands.

Radio 5 Live horse racing presenter Gina Bryce promoted Bee Smith Millinery and Jane Lewis Atelier in a tweet about the company’s coverage of the famous race.

The company has now issued guidelines on this again.

The BBC’s editorial guidelines state: “No on-air talent shall promote the products, goods, services or clothing which they use on air”.

The company said a complaint that had been made had merit, saying: ‘Regarding a tweet posted by Gina on the day tagging the marks she was wearing, while also tagging the BBC 5 Live page and in discussing his work, we do agree that it would go beyond the usual BBC expectations.

The complaint filed by Alex May also related to Bryce’s work with Paddy Power, but it was ruled that she did not break the rules of this partnership.

The Times also discovered that Dan Walker had posted about brands offering him discount clothing – after which he quit ahead of his recent stint at Channel 5 News.

The Times also discovered that Dan Walker had published articles about the brands that offered him discounted clothes.

The Times also discovered that Dan Walker had published articles about the brands that offered him discounted clothes.

Walker, 44, received clothes and shoes from Castore and Oliver Sweeney, but the BBC said he broke no rules.

Despite this, a source close to Walker said he will no longer accept third-party gifts because of the optics.

A BBC spokesperson said: ‘This has been investigated and dealt with internally.

Michael O. Stutler